Genius: the ability to dissect

To dissect means to cut into two parts. The official definition of the word is – ‘the dismembering of the body of a deceased animal or plant to study its anatomical  structure.’ But that’s not the only kind of dissection.

All the geniuses that came before us had one thing in common – the ability to dissect. But I’m not talking about dead animals. A genius has the ability to dissect concepts and problems.

Concepts and problems all are presented through information. If you don’t have enough information, neither can you understand the former nor solve the latter. But many of the times, concepts and problems come with too much information. An untrained mind is overwhelmed by the information and in the process, ignores the useful information and fixates on the useless.

The difference between an untrained mind and a genius one is that a genius cuts the information efficiently into two parts – useful and useless. The useful information is put to appropriate use. And while a normal untrained mind would throw out the useless information, the genius mind keeps it stored safely away for further possible use. To a genius, useful information is of great apparent value and the apparently useless information is of great future value.

The reason a genius is able to differentiate clearly between relevant and irrelevant information is the same one as the reason for dissection being an efficient method to study biology.

A biologist dissects the various parts of an animal. Then he looks at those parts and perhaps sketches them. Or maybe he takes photos. The bottom line is that he converts it into any kind of visual form.  A genius mind does a similar thing. It converts written, audible and sensory information into visual imagery. A genius understands a concept or gets to the root of a problem faster – not because he is trying harder than anyone to understand. It is because he has cut the problem or the concept into two parts – the useful and the useless. And now, it is laid out before his eyes. He understands a problem or a concept only because he doesn’t have to – it is right in front of his mind’s eye.

A genius understands a concept or gets to the root of a problem faster – not because he is trying harder than anyone to understand. It is because he has cut the problem or the concept into two parts – the useful and the useless. And now, it is laid out before his eyes. He understands a problem or a concept only because he doesn’t have to – it is right in front of his mind’s eye.

This mind’s eye that I speak of is also referred to as visualising power. The better and more efficiently a brain can visualise a thought, the closer it is to being a genius mind.

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